Listening through the Noise: The Aesthetics of Experimental Electronic Music

By Joanna Demers | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

First and foremost, I would like to thank the artists whose work inspired me and got me through many early mornings.

I would also like to express my gratitude to the following sources of research and publication support, without which I would not have been able to finish this project: the American Association of University Women’s American Fellow Postdoctoral Grant; the University of Southern California’s Advancing Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences Grant; and the American Musicological Society’s Joseph Kerman Publication Subvention. I also owe thanks to my colleagues at USC’s Thornton School of Music, whose intellectual and professional support were exemplary. Robert Vaughn’s willingness to order strange and wonderful electronic music for USC’s music library made this a much richer book than it would have been without his help.

My parents, Jim and Joan, and brother, Ed, have cheered me on from my first music lessons onward, and I thank them for their love and encouragement. Norm Hirschy is as kind and nurturing an editor as one could ever hope to meet, and I thank him for seeing this project through to completion. Kim Cascone, Richard Chartier, Ezekiel Honig, Thrill Jockey Records, Steve Takasugi, Touch Records, and Miki Yui graciously licensed audio examples for this book’s companion Web site. I received indispensable feedback and suggestions from many friends, including Giorgio Biancorosso, Kevin Dettmar, Luisa Greenfield, Andy Hamilton, Brian Kane, David Nicholls, Scott Paulin, Patricia Schmidt, Steve Takasugi, and Ming Tsao. I am especially grateful to Mandy Wong for her friendship and insight on philosophy, electronic music, and synth-pop; our conversations brightened what could have easily been a tough and lonely slog.

To say that I am grateful to my husband and daughter does not begin to describe what I feel. Inouk and Nola are the most wonderful treasures in my life, and I thank them for everything.

-v-

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Listening through the Noise: The Aesthetics of Experimental Electronic Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • About the Companion Web Site ix
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I - Sign 19
  • 1 - Listening to Signs in Post-Schaefferian Electroacoustic Music 21
  • 2 - Material as Sign in Electronica 43
  • Part II - Object 67
  • 3 - Minimal Objects in Microsound 69
  • 4 - Maximal Objects in Drone Music, Dub Techno, and Noise 91
  • Part III - Situation 111
  • 5 - Site in Ambient, Soundscape, and Field Recordings 113
  • 6 - Genre, Experimental Ism, and the Musical Frame 135
  • Conclusion 155
  • Glossary 163
  • Bibliography 179
  • Discography 191
  • Index 195
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