Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era

By Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff | Go to book overview
ILLUSTRATIONS
Hallie Flanagan, national director of the FTP38
New York City FTP Negro Unit theater and stage workers48
Clarence Muse, Los Angeles FTP Negro Unit director49
Scene from Walk Together, Chillun58
Cast of Swing Mikado67
Four Jitterbugs from Swing Mikado71
Eleanor Roosevelt and Colonel Harrington76
Jitterbugs dance in the aisle at New York Swing Mikado77
Joe Louis demonstrates boxing technique to soldiers128
Elmer Davis, director of the OWI130
Joe Louis and his fellow soldiers147
Joe Louis boxes Elza Thompson149
Enlistment poster featuring Joe Louis154
Staf of the AFRS (c. 1942)164
Tom Lewis, commander of the AFRS165
Black infantrymen in training, Fort Belvoir168
Major Mann Holiner, producer of Jubilee176
Ernest Whitman, Lena Horne, and Eddie Green181
Lena Horne in Stormy Weather (1943)187
Bing Crosby and Eddie Green190
Hattie McDaniel and Mary McLeod Bethune210
Ethel Waters in Cabin in the Sky (1943)213
Lena Horne and Bill Robinson in Stormy Weather (1943)217
Multiethnic platoon in Bataan (1943)223
Scene from Sahara (1943) featuring Rex Ingram225
Cast of Lifeboat (1944) featuring Canada Lee229

-ix-

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