Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era

By Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

After he received the seminal civil rights report, To Secure These Rights (1947), President Harry Truman expressed outrage towards the prevalence of racial violence and discrimination in America. After discovering that African American veterans had been murdered in several southern states, he declared, “I can’t approve of such goings on and … I am going to try to remedy it and if that ends up in my failure to be reelected, that failure will be in a good cause.”1 This statement reveals a larger executive commitment to civil rights than Franklin Roosevelt was ever willing to advocate. In creating a Presidential Commission on Civil Rights and issuing his 1948 executive order to ensure “equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services, without regard to race,” Truman demonstrated an unprecedented presidential interest in the rights of African Americans.2 If the New Deal era provided the foundation for the civil rights movement, political divisions that had plagued the passage of racial legislation since Roosevelt’s first term still remained. Viewing Truman as the ultimate “scalawag,” southern legislators remained devoted to the cause of white supremacy, opposing the elimination of the poll tax and the creation of a permanent Fair Employment Practices Commission. After the 1948 election, an alliance of southern Democrats and Republicans in Congress blocked Truman’s proposed civil rights measures. While this coalition temporarily stalled federal action, Truman’s promotion of racial justice had a profound influence on politics in the postwar period. As historian William Leuchtenburg argues, Truman “had placed civil rights irrevocably on the national agenda, had reconfigured America’s election maps, and had set in motion a chain of events that made the greater achievements of the 1960s possible.”3

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Culture and the New Deal: The Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Ambivalent Inclusion 15
  • Chapter Two - Hooked on Classics 33
  • Chapter Three - The Editor’s Dilemma 81
  • Chapter Four - Constructing G.I. Joe Louis 123
  • Chapter Five - Variety for the Servicemen 159
  • Chapter Six - Projecting Unity 193
  • Epilogue 241
  • Notes 253
  • Bibliography 287
  • Index 301
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.