García Márquez: The Man and His Work

By Gene H. Bell-Villada | Go to book overview

FOUR
The Man & His Politics

Garcia Marquez’s mornings have been traditionally reserved exclusively for writing. Awake at six o’clock, he sips a cup of coffee and reads the newspaper in bed. He then puts on his writing gear (blue one-piece coveralls with a front zipper), and if in Mexico City he heads for the specially made bungalow he has in his backyard. There, amid heating to offset the mountain chill, and the background strains of one of his several thousand classical recordings, he works until one or two o’clock, after which he has lunch with family and other intimates, to whom he might dedicate the rest of the day. Anyone wishing to see the man must go through an obstacle course consisting of old friends, the housekeeper, his sons, and his wife and meet with the successive approval of each.

Owing to his hands-on experience in journalism, García Márquez is of all the great living authors the one who is closest to everyday reality. No doubt the trade taught him to write clearly, in a prose style accessible to the general reader. When asked about the influence of the journalist on the novelist, however, García Márquez tends to dwell not so much on clear prose as on the practice of writing regularly with discipline, and also on the custom of including those little details that help make a stretch of prose convincing— much as he did in One Hundred Years with Father Nicanor Reyna’s cup of hot chocolate or with Mauricio Babilonia’s yellow butterflies.

To an unusual degree, García Márquez is the poet of plebeian and street life. It is the world that he claims to know best and to deliberately have cultivated, and in truth few novelists can match the understanding, eloquence, and dignity he brings to his depictions of smugglers, street performers, prostitutes, cockfight gatherings, and other extra-official “people’s” subjects (not to mention workers’ strikes and political uprisings). By the same token García Márquez has all his life written with passion and commitment about popular culture—indeed its vindication has long been a kind of personal mission with him. In his twenties he wrote articles in praise of comic strips and suggested that they may constitute a legitimate literary genre (this some decades before “graphic novels” became an accepted term). Along similar lines he has often eulogized such Afro-Hispanic musical forms as the guaracha, the mambo,

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
García Márquez: The Man and His Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to the Second Edition ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • A Note on the Text xv
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Part One- Backgrounds 1
  • One- The Novel 3
  • Two- The Country 15
  • Three- The Writer’s Life 41
  • Four- The Man & His Politics 64
  • Five- The Readings 70
  • Part Two- Works 93
  • Six- The History of Macondo 95
  • Seven- The Master of Short Forms 120
  • Eight Juvenilia & Apprenticeship (a Brief Interlude) 158
  • Nine- The Anatomy of Tyranny 168
  • Ten- The Novelist of Love 194
  • Eleven- The Bolívar Novel 220
  • Twelve- The Unending Love Story 237
  • Thirteen- The Journalist & Memoirist 267
  • Fourteen- The Legacy 285
  • Notes 293
  • Select Bibliography 305
  • Index 329
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 339

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.