Domestic Violence and Mandatory Arrest: Influences on Police Officer Actions

By John F. Waldron | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
The History of Domestic Violence

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE 1970’S

Domestic violence is not a recent phenomenon that was only addressed in the late Twentieth Century. The basis for the patriarchal, male dominated society extends back to Biblical times and can be seen in The Bible itself (Genesis 3:16, Ephesians 5:22-23, Num. 5:29-30). Blackstone’s codification of the common law in 1768 asserted that a husband had the right to “physically chastise” an errant wife, provided the stick was no bigger than his thumb (Straus & Gelles, 1986). This patriarchal concept of the right for a husband to chastise his wife with a whip or rattan no bigger than his thumb around was upheld in a Mississippi court in Bradley v. State (1824). However, this was one of only three nineteenth century American appellate court rulings that held that a husband had a right to beat a wife in “moderation” (Sherman, 1992). The structural element of patriarchy can be seen in the low status that women generally held relative to men in the family, and in the economic, educational, political, and legal institutions of the times. The legitimacy of male dominance in the patriarchal society is clearly reflected in the values, beliefs, and norms of the times and American society (Yllo and Straus, 1984).

Balancing these facts is evidence that there are three distinct eras when attempts to outlaw spousal abuse by men have occurred in North America over the past three centuries. In 1642, American Puritans in the Massachusetts Bay Colony drew up their own criminal code, which provided:

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Domestic Violence and Mandatory Arrest: Influences on Police Officer Actions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction to the Mandatory Arrest for the Crime of Domestic Violence 1
  • Chapter 2 - The History of Domestic Violence 15
  • Chapter 3 - Research Design 39
  • Chapter 4 - Research Findings 49
  • Chapter 5 - Discussion and Conclusions regarding Domestic Violence 139
  • Appendices 171
  • References 223
  • Index 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.