Enlisting Masculinity: The Construction of Gender in U.S. Military Recruiting Advertising during the All-Volunteer Force

By Melissa T. Brown | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My completion of this project has depended on the support of many people. I’d like to thank the Gender and International Relations series editors for giving me the opportunity to be a part of the series. J. Ann Tickner carved a path in feminist international relations for the rest of us to follow, and Laura Sjoberg has encouraged my work for several years, as indeed her tireless work within the discipline has provided opportunities for many feminist IR scholars. I also owe thanks to Angela Chnapko at Oxford University Press for leading me through the publishing process. This book started life as a dissertation, and I’m grateful to the members of my dissertation committee, Leela Fernandes, Edward Rhodes, and Cynthia Daniels, for the feedback and guidance they gave me throughout my time at Rutgers. The work of Cynthia Enloe, my outside reader, is an inspiration and a model; if I hadn’t read Bananas, Beaches, and Bases as an undergraduate, I never would have gone to graduate school. And I never would have made it through graduate school without the support of many of my fellow students, some of whom formed ill-fated dissertationwriting groups with me, and all of whom provided me with friendship and a supportive intellectual community. They include Sarah Alexander, Molly Baab, Jon DiCicco, Martin Edwards, Jen Einspahr, Alexandra Filindra, Denise Horn, Krista Jenkins, and Nichole Shippen. I’d like to thank my colleagues in the Social Science Department at BMCC (and especially my officemates, Geoffrey Kurtz and Jacob Kramer) for their good humor and support; it’s wonderful to be a part of such a collegial academic community. Alyse, Jill, Lisa, Aimee, Nicole, and the Whitemans always encourage me and can usually amuse me as well. My family has cheered me on, even though I’ve generally refused to talk about what I’m doing and when I’ll be done doing it. Finally, my biggest debt of gratitude is to Sanford Whiteman. He’s provided me with encouragement, affection, research help, and technical assistance, and he’s good at identifying Air Force planes in recruiting ads.

-ix-

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Enlisting Masculinity: The Construction of Gender in U.S. Military Recruiting Advertising during the All-Volunteer Force
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations and Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1- Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2- Concepts and Context - Masculinity, Citizenship, and the Creation of the All-Volunteer Force 18
  • Chapter 3- The Army 41
  • Chapter 4- The Navy 74
  • Chapter 5- The Marine Corps 104
  • Chapter 6- The Air Force 130
  • Chapter 7- Recruiting a Volunteer Force in Wartime 158
  • Chapter 8- Conclusion 178
  • Appendix 187
  • Notes 195
  • Bibliography 205
  • Index 215
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