Erotic Subjects: The Sexuality of Politics in Early Modern English Literature

By Melissa E. Sanchez | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have incurred many debts in the process of writing this book, and it is a pleasure to acknowledge them here. Without generous institutional support, I never could have begun, much less completed, this project. This book saw its start with an Andrew C. Mellon summer fellowship at the Huntington Library; years later, support from the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute allowed me to return to the Huntington to pursue research that proved critical to the book’s completion. San Francisco State University and the University of Pennsylvania facilitated my writing with course relief, sabbatical leave, and research and travel grants. In particular, support from Penn’s Alice Paul Center for Research on Women Gender, and Sexuality made it possible for me to conduct essential research at the Bodleian, Folger, and British Libraries.

I thank The Sidney Journal, English Literary Renaissance, and ELH for permission to reproduce versions of arguments that first appeared in their pages. An early version of chapter 2 appeared as “‘The True Vowed Sacrifice of Unfeigned Love’: Eros and Authority in The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia” in The Sidney Journal 22 (2004): 90–105; portions of chapter 3 appeared as “Fantasies of Friendship in The Faerie Queene, Book IV” in English Literary Renaissance 37 (2007): 250–273; and chapter 5 appeared in an early form as “The Politics of Masochism in Mary Wroth’s Urania” in ELH 74 (2007): 449–478.

I am especially happy to acknowledge my personal and intellectual debts, and I regret that space does not allow me to describe these in the detail they deserve. I wrote several early chapters of this book at San Francisco State, where Paul Sherwin, Julie Paulson, and Sara Hackenberg were insightful readers. At the University of Pennsylvania, I have benefited from the brilliance and friendship of my colleagues. Toni Bowers, Margreta de Grazia, Suvir Kaul, Zack Lesser, Ania Loomba, Phyllis Rackin, and Peter Stallybrass read substantial portions of this book, and their rigorous comments helped me to see what it was really about. Rita Barnard, Rita Copeland, David Eng, Jim English, David Kazanjian, Yolanda Padilla, Josephine Park, Emily Steiner, David Wallace, and Chi-ming Yang gave me advice and encouragement when I needed it most. Nancy Bentley, Rebecca Bushnell, Tim Corrigan, Stuart Curran, Peter de Cherney, Jed Esty, Michael Gamer, Amy Kaplan, Demie Kurz, Heather Love, Cary Mazer, Ann Matter, Paul Saint-Amour, Wendy

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