Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity

By Scott Watson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
CREATIVITY
WITH INSTRUCTIONAL
SOFTWARE AND OTHER
MUSIC APPLICATIONS

OVERVIEW

THIS CHAPTER EXAMINES SEVERAL TYPES of music applications not covered thus far in part II of this book. Many have diverse components that can be used with music students to accomplish a variety of educational goals. While this versatility makes these applications appealing for music teachers, it certainly makes it daunting to try to categorize them. A further distinction can be made between conventional software programs that run locally on a particular computer and web applications that run in the browser of anyone with access to the Internet. I divide our examination of these varied music programs into three broad groups: (1) instructional software, (2) creativity applications, and (3) web applications. The common thread in all three groups is their potential to be used with students in producing creative musical content.

I do not attempt to provide a comprehensive catalog of useful, available music creativity applications here. Why? First, I do not want to give the impression that the approach presented in this book depends on any particular software (or hardware). Second, technology is changing all the time, so any listing could not help but be dated. Recently I presented on the topic of this book at a large music educator conference. During the several days of the conference I learned of two great, new programs that could be used to this end. One was a traditional computer software program, and the other a newer web application. I ended up making last-minute changes to my presentation to include them both. Literally dozens of such programs have come to my attention just during the time I have been working on this book!


INSTRUCTIONAL SOFTWARE

The main focus of music instruction software is to introduce and reinforce musical concepts using tutorials, drill and practice activities, and even fun review games. However, some instructional programs also include components that allow students to put the concepts presented to use in appealing creative activities. The following are examples of instructional software that have a creative

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.