An Example for All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C

By Kate Masur | Go to book overview

Index
Abolitionists: and universal rights, 4; and Smithsonian lecture series, 23; opposing colonization, 36; and Garnet’s address to Congress, 49; and images of slaves’ families, 65; and black public schools, 80; and freedpeople’s emigration, 107; and franchise as right, 130; and public accommodations, 285 (n. 36)
Act to Incorporate the Metropolitan Railroad, 106, 286 (n. 58)
Act to Regulate the Elective Franchise, 146
Adams, Lois Bryan, 95, 97, 109
African American children: and attitudes of Freedmen’s Bureau administrators, 54; and reuniting separated families, 65, 68, 74–75, 263; parents’ rights to, 76; population of, 79; and missionary schools, 83, 84, 85; civilizational level of, 190–91. See also Black private schools; Black public schools
African American churches: and black political activism, 8, 48, 146–47, 156; and political and civic organizing, 11; and black delegation to Lincoln, 13; and black associations, 20; and fugitives from slavery, 31, 34; and freedpeople’s relief, 31–34, 41; and Emancipation Proclamation, 41, 42; and black public schools, 77; and public school integration, 85; and Emancipation Day celebrations, 120; in first ward, 132; and African American men’s enfranchisement, 132, 134. See also specific churches
African American men: and jury service, 1, 158, 159, 192, 262; and public office, 1, 158, 159, 192, 262; as day laborers, 19, 148, 150, 154–56, 158, 173, 208–10, 212, 222, 223, 232; and streetcar access, 111; as voters, 147–48. See also Black soldiers
African American men’s enfranchisement: reaction against, 1, 2, 10–11, 172–73, 178, 194, 196–99, 216, 219, 222–24, 249–52, 258–59; and Republican Party, 1, 9, 11, 118, 120, 126, 130–31, 135, 138–45, 146, 174, 176, 199, 216, 259, 262; and territorial government of Washington, D.C., 10, 216– 17, 250, 252–53, 255; and woman suffrage, 11, 174–75, 180–81, 183–84, 262; and black public schools, 80; and Reconstruction policies, 112, 139, 146, 238, 251–52; and white violence, 117; and petitions, 117, 132, 133–34; and Congress, 126, 130–31, 132, 133, 134–35, 137–41, 262; and capacity to vote, 126, 134, 145, 180, 188, 197, 198, 199, 216, 219, 222, 250, 251, 252, 254–55, 258; and social equality, 127, 129, 130, 134, 136–37, 140; debates on, 127, 130; local opposition to, 127, 134–37; and political equality, 130, 137, 147, 192; public demonstration for, 131; and class issues, 131, 138, 140, 143–44, 146, 148; and black political activism, 131–34, 146, 172, 178, 259; and military service, 133, 134, 139; and taxpayer status, 133, 139; and economic issues, 135–36, 138, 150, 197, 219; and Democratic Party, 136–37, 143, 172, 176, 180, 197; and racial hierarchies, 137, 138, 140, 143, 183; qualifications imposed on, 138, 139, 142; and South, 145, 146, 176–77, 180, 183, 238, 252, 259; and public works employment, 146, 150, 151, 208; and first election, 147–48; and corruption, 175, 198, 222; and consolidation of governance of Washington, D.C., 194, 195, 196, 198,

-343-

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An Example for All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Maps ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Everywhere Is Freedom and Everybody Free 13
  • 2 - They Feel It Is Their Right 51
  • 3 - Someone Must Lead the Way 87
  • 4 - First among Them Is the Right of Suffrage 127
  • 5 - Make Haste Slowly 174
  • 6 - To Save the Common Property and Respectability of All 214
  • Epilogue 257
  • Notes 267
  • Works Cited 311
  • Acknowledgments 339
  • Index 343
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