At the Precipice: Americans North and South during the Secession Crisis

By Shearer Davis Bowman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many years ago in Austin, Texas, Gary Gallagher and Mike Parrish invited me to do the volume on the 1860–61 secession crisis for the Littlefield Sesquicentennial History of the Civil War. They seemed to expect that I, like my graduate school mentor Ken Stampp, could do creditable historical research and analysis both north and south of the MasonDixon Line and Ohio River. They may have also hoped that my earlier work as a transatlantic comparative historian, published as Masters and Lords: Mid-19th-Century U.S. Planters and Prussian Junkers (1993), indicated that I could treat accurately and fairly both southern secessionists and northern Unionists on the eve of the Civil War. Readers and reviewers, of course, will decide for themselves whether I have succeeded. I regret that Ken Stampp did not live to see the final product; my appreciation for his scholarship and guidance only grew as we aged.

Mike Parrish and Bill Link provided scorching yet hopeful commentary on an earlier version of the book, and Mike frequently made helpful recommendations and even gifts of particular articles and monographs. Like all scholars, I could not have completed this project without the invaluable aid of many librarians and archivists. Particularly helpful over the past decade were staff members at Berea College, the Chicago Historical Society, the Huntington Library, the New York Public Library, the New-York Historical Society, the Newberry Library, the University of Kentucky Library, the University of Texas at Austin Library, and the Virginia Historical Society.

During the many years in which I researched, composed, and revised this book, a number of friends and colleagues provided support and encouragement at opportune moments: Tighe and Hugh Antrim, Kathy DeBoer, Bill Freehling, Chesley and Lee Garrett, David Hamilton, Helen and Steve Kelly, Bruce Levine, Howard Miller, Bob Moeller, Jim Oakes, Mark Pittman, Jim Sidbury, and Mark Summers. Because I have asked none of them to read and comment on any chapter of this book, they are all absolved of any responsibility for knowing exactly what to expect, much less agreeing with it.

Lee Willey Bowman, Kate Bowman, and Willis Bowman never seriously doubted that someday the book would be finished and even published. After all, nearly two decades passed before my initial vision of a monographic study juxtaposing planters and Junkers became a reality.

Although editor in chief David Perry of UNC Press may have had occasional doubts that this volume would ever make it into print, he was and is too much the consummate professional to let those doubts surface. Zach Read helped shepherd the manuscript along when it was submitted to the Press.

My siblings and their spouses probably wondered whether a book on the secession crisis was worth the expenditure of so much time and energy, but they still expressed hopeful interest in the final product. Because John and Ginny Bowman, Jane and John Fain, Susan and David Reynolds, John and Andrea Willey, and Willis and Vance Willey

-357-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
At the Precipice: Americans North and South during the Secession Crisis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.