Ducktown Smoke: The Fight over One of the South's Greatest Environmental Disasters

By Duncan Maysilles | Go to book overview

Notes
Abbreviations
DBMDucktown Basin Museum, Ducktown, Tenn.
GDAHGeorgia Department of Archives and History, Morrow, Ga.
NARANational Archives and Record Administration, Washington, D.C.
NFUNational Farmers Union Collection, University of Colorado Archives, Boulder, Colo.
TSLATennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tenn,

Introduction

1. Deposition of B. H. Sebolt (1914), Transcript, 265–72, Georgia v. Tennessee Copper Co., U.S. Supreme Court, No. 1 Original, October Term, 1915. The docket numbers in this case are confusing because as an original jurisdiction action, it received a new docket number for each term in which the case came before the Supreme Court. The initial designation of the case when filed in 1905 was No. 13 Original, October Term, 1905, and when finally dismissed in 1937, it received its final designation, No. 1 Original, October Term, 1937. Documents filed in one term were frequently renumbered for use in subsequent terms. NARA archives the entire case file from 1905 to 1937 under its final 1937 designation. To avoid confusion, cited documents from the case are identified primarily by type and date rather than by docket number.

2. In most of the primary documents, writers used the old spelling “sulphur” instead of the modern, “sulfur.” I use the modern spelling except in reference to the company name, Ducktown Sulphur, Copper & Iron Company and wherever the old spelling appears in titles of cited works. Note that Ducktown is also the name of a mining town (formerly known as Hiwassee) adjacent to the Burra Burra Mine; however, unless otherwise specified, references herein to Ducktown are to the region, such as the Ducktown Basin, the Ducktown Mining District, or, more generally, Ducktown. This was the common usage at the time of the smoke litigation.

3. McCallie, “The Ducktown Copper Mining District”; Chase, Rich Land, Poor Land, 49–53; Smallshaw, “Denudation and Erosion in the Copper Basin,” 1; Clay, “CopperBasin Cover-Up.” Others acknowledged the devastation while appreciating the economic significance of the industry. See, e.g., Robards, “Tennessee’s Wealthy Wasteland.”

4. Barclay, “Information on Copperhill, Tennessee, for Inclusion in the American Guide Manual,” Barclay Papers, box 1, folder 7, TSLA; Workers of the Writers’ Program of the Works Progress Administration in Georgia, Georgia: The WPA Guide to Its Towns and Countryside, 472.

5. Burt, “Desert in the Appalachians”; Barnhardt, “The Death of Ducktown.” For similar views, see Teale, “The Murder of a Landscape”; Ottewell, “There Are No Ducks in Ducktown.”

6. McKinney, “Bad Lands of Copperhill”; Quinn, “Tennessee’s Copper Basin: A Case for Preserving an Abused Landscape.” Apart from local sensibilities, Quinn urged preservation of at least a portion of the badlands for their historical significance. The comments

-259-

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