Engines of Innovation: The Entrepreneurial University in the Twenty-First Century

By Holden Thorp; Buck Goldstein | Go to book overview

2
Enterpreneurial Science

At even the most traditional research universities, the science buildings stand out. They are bigger, newer, and bristling with technology. These modern temples are often designed to blend modestly with older campus architecture only to betray their purpose with complex air-handling systems and satellite dishes crowding the roof. Although the campus tour guide may describe these buildings as chemistry or biology departments, and the directory on the first floor may list a department chair or the location of administrative offices, no simple organizational chart can describe the complex set of relationships that drive and finance a top-flight department in the physical or biological sciences. Traditionally, the heart of all of these enterprises is a laboratory led by a tenured professor, staffed by undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral students, and supported with millions of dollars of equipment. After a $1 to $2 million initial investment, a lab’s annual operating budget can range between $500,000 and $5 million depending on the lab’s size. Nearly all of the ongoing support for these labs comes from public and private sources in the form of general and sponsored research grants. The top twenty research institutions receive more than a third of roughly $30 billion awarded annually in federal research funds, and the top one hundred receive close to 80 percent. Supported by a total pool of nearly $50 billion, science has become central to the economic model of every research university.1

-22-

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Engines of Innovation: The Entrepreneurial University in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Enterpreneurial Opportunity 9
  • 2 - Enterpreneurial Science 22
  • 3 - Enterprise Creation 38
  • 4 - Social Entrepreneurship 53
  • 5 - Multidisciplinary Centers 68
  • 6 - Leadership 85
  • 7 - Academic Roles 97
  • 8 - Culture and Structure 106
  • 9 - Teaching Entrepreneurship 118
  • 10 - Accountability 133
  • 11 - The New Donors and University Development 141
  • Conclusion 151
  • Notes 155
  • Acknowledgments 161
  • Index 163
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