The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation: African Americans and the Fight for Freedom

By Glenn David Brasher | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Indirectly, this project began in 1989 when as a college student I went to the movie theater and saw Glory. I always had had a fascination with history but not an especially strong interest in the Civil War. I understood that the primary cause of the conflict was the South’s desire to preserve slavery, but that meant little to me as a white Alabamian. When I thought about or discussed the Civil War at all, I tended to celebrate the South’s valiant struggle against great odds. In short, I rooted for the home team. But Glory changed that. The opening battle scene was immediately engrossing, and the film’s powerful depiction of runaway slaves fighting for freedom pulled me into a world that in many ways I have never left. When teardrops slid from Denzel Washington’s eye as his defiant character was being whipped, I realized that the Civil War involved something more profound than just southern military heroics. I was exhilarated when Morgan Freeman’s character stopped to speak to young black children who were admiring the African American soldiers as they handsomely marched by. “That’s right honeys,” he announced, “ain’t no dream. We runaway slaves but we come back fighting men!” During the black prayer meeting the night before the final battle scene, I choked up as Washington asked rhetorically, “We men, ain’t we?” When day dawned in the movie’s last scene and the Confederate flag still flew triumphantly over Fort Wagner, my heart plummeted, and I instantly knew that I would never view the Civil War the same. Thus, as melodramatic as it may sound, it is only fitting that I begin my acknowledgments by thanking everyone involved with the production of the movie Glory.

My interest in the Civil War broadened in time, especially when I began visiting battlefield sites. There is something indefinably special about connecting to the past by standing on hallowed grounds, and I hope that this book demonstrates my conviction that the Civil War’s social and political dimensions are best understood within the context of the war’s military events (and vice versa). In 1995, thanks to the suggestion of Peter S. Carmichael (then a seasonal park ranger, now director of Gettysburg’s Civil War Institute), Edward Sanders recruited me as a volunteer at the Richmond National Battlefield Park, and that eventually led to my first job for which my college degree prepared me (that is a special blessing when you are a history major). Working as a seasonal park ranger, I learned more about the Civil War and the Peninsula Campaign from conversations on the battlefields with my friends and colleagues than I could have ever learned on

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation: African Americans and the Fight for Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.