Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research

By Kevin C. Elliott | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Portions of chapters 4, 5, and 6 are adapted from three of my articles: “Scientific Judgment and the Limits of Conflict-of-Interest Policies,” Accountability in Research: Policies and Quality Assurance 15 (2008): 1–29 (© Taylor and Francis Group, LLC); “A Case for Deliberation in Response to Hormesis Research,” Human and Experimental Toxicology 27 (2008): 529–38 (© 2008 Sage Publications); and “An Ethics of Expertise Based on Informed Consent,” Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2006): 637–61 (© 2006 Opragen Publications, with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media). Smaller portions of chapters 2 and 7 draw from two other articles: “The Ethical Significance of Language in the Environmental Sciences: Case Studies from Pollution Research,” Ethics, Place, and Environment 12 (2009): 157–73 (© 2009 Taylor and Francis), and (with Daniel McKaughan) “How Values in Scientific Discovery and Pursuit Alter Theory Appraisal,” Philosophy of Science 76 (2009): 598–611 (© 2010 by the Philosophy of Science Association).

It is humbling to consider how many people have assisted me in the creation of this book. My research on hormesis, which ultimately gave rise to this volume, began while I was a graduate student in the Program in History and Philosophy of Science (HPS) at the University of Notre Dame. I was assisted by two fellowships during my time there: a Notre Dame Presidential Fellowship and a Pew Younger Scholars Fellowship from the Pew Charitable Trusts. My work took a significant step forward when I attended a conference on hormesis in January 2000, thanks to support from Don Howard, the director of the HPS program, and Kristin Shrader-Frechette, the O’Neill Family Chair in Philosophy. I continued to work on the book while serving as a faculty member with a joint appointment in the Department of Philosophy at Louisiana State University and at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center (PBRC) of the LSU System. My thanks go to John Whittaker, the philosophy chair who created the unique position that I held, and to Claude Bouchard, the executive director of PBRC, who provided me with ample time and support to work on the project. I completed the project at the University of South Carolina, where I have received invaluable guidance from my colleagues.

-ix-

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Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction- Societal Values and Environmental Research 3
  • 2 - The Hormesis Case 18
  • 3 - An Argument for Societal Values in Policy-Relevant Research 55
  • 4 - Lesson #1 Safeguarding Science 81
  • 5 - Lesson #2 Diagnosing Deliberation 109
  • 6 - Lesson #3 Ethics for Experts 132
  • 7 - The McS and Ed Cases 160
  • 8 - Conclusion 189
  • References 201
  • Index 227
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