Deus in Machina: Religion, Technology, and the Things in Between

By Jeremy Stolow | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was first conceived during conversations that took place while I was a visiting fellow at the Center for Religion and Media at New York University in 2003–2004. My thanks to all the members of the Center during that time, especially Faye Ginsburg, Angela Zito, Elizabeth Castelli, and Mazyar Lotfalian. In January 2007 I convened a colloquium at the Art Gallery of Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) entitled “Deus in Machina,” which led to the present volume. I wish to acknowledge the following financial supporters, without whom this colloquium would not have happened: the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada; the Office of the Dean of Social Science, McMaster University; the Office of the Vice President (Research), McMaster University; the Office of the Provost, McMaster University; and the Office of the Dean of Humanities, McMaster University. Acknowledgement must also be given to the participants in that colloquium who greatly sharpened our collective understanding of religion and technology, especially, but not only: James Benn, Ellen Badone, Thomas A. Carlson, Yasser Haddarah, Stephen Hughes, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Travis Kroeker, Mazyar Lotfalian, Carly Machado, Valentina Napolitano, Celia Rothenberg, Mark Rowe, and Dorien Zandbergen. A special word of thanks goes to Benjamin Fleming for his tremendous help as the colloquium’s administrative assistant.

At Fordham University Press, I wish to thank above all Helen Tartar, whose vision, exacting standards, and scholarly passion are unparalleled in academic publishing. It has been a sheer pleasure to work with her, alongside the other diligent staff members of the press—not least, Thomas Lay—who helped bring this book to its successful conclusion.

For his contribution to this book, John Durham Peters wishes to thank Routledge for permission to adapt and revise the previously published entries “Calendar” and “Clock” in The Encyclopedia of Religion, Communication, and Media, ed. Daniel A. Stout (New York: Routledge, 2006), 57–59, 77–79. Sherine Hamdy wishes to thank the journal Anthropology Quarterly for

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