Broadcasting the Civil War in El Salvador: A Memoir of Guerrilla Radio

By Carlos Henríquez Consalvi; Charles Leo Nagle V et al. | Go to book overview

Epilogue, 2003

IT’S BEEN ELEVEN YEARS since the war ended. The country has undergone changes for the better. Peace has been established. Exclusion from the political process has come to an end, and progress has been made in the democratization of El Salvador. The guerrilla front, now a legitimate political party, has won in the major cities, and there is the possibility of a political system in which groups alternate holding office. However, some of the issues that were at the very root of the war still remain. They are stains on the social fabric, reminding us that peace won’t last as long as we are unable to resolve the health, work, education, housing, and land ownership problems that have plagued us for so long.

Radio Venceremos, in its role as a radio informant for the county, faded away when peace was achieved. Those who took over the Radio dismissed those of us who were directly involved with it and converted it into “the only English-Spanish radio station.” But other media and young journalists follow in the footsteps of Radio Venceremos, giving a voice to those who have never enjoyed freedom of expression.

Even though we no longer practice radio journalism, we continue working in communications through the Museum of Word and Image, preserving what is now historical memory, as well as all of those elements of our own identity that will be indispensable when the time comes to forge a new future. In the years since the war, we have collected and preserved a historical archive that contains not only manuscripts and audiovisual media relating to the struggle, but also Salvadoran history and culture. The archive is something that we put on display all across El Salvador. We’ve succeeded in publishing a number of books, and we’ve just finished a full-length documentary, 1932, which tells the story of the popular rebellion that took place that year.

On a more personal note, I can tell you that I am a happy man, committed to my conscience and its principles and intimately aware of what it means to have become part of a country like El Salvador. It’s the most precious thing I can give

-223-

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Broadcasting the Civil War in El Salvador: A Memoir of Guerrilla Radio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xiii
  • List of Acronyms xv
  • Introduction - Peasant Insurgency and Guerrilla Radio in Northern Morazán, El Salvador xvii
  • 1980 1
  • 1981 17
  • 1982 89
  • 1983 121
  • 1984 169
  • Epilogue, 1992 217
  • Epilogue, 2003 223
  • Epilogue, 2009 225
  • Index 227
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