Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier

By Lea Vandervelde | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
The Call of the Wood as a
Prelude to Treaty

IN THE 1830S, great primal forests of tall white pine timber situated along Lake Superior’s southern coast in Wisconsin territory were an even more significant natural resource to the nation than lead or furs. These white pine forests no longer exist, but in the 1830s the fate of national expansion depended on them and their fate was to be decided by a treaty at St. Peter’s.

Wood was as necessary for building the frontier as it was rare. At that time, all lumber destined for St. Louis and other upper Mississippi towns had to be shipped in from mills located in the East. This shortage was felt even at the agency.1 Westward expansion had reached the continent’s central river, but west of the Mississippi the lands were mostly treeless prairie. Those trees, running along creek beds and river valley pockets, were the shorter, scrubbier softwood varieties, unsuitable as building materials. But south of Lake Superior there were tall straight pine forests. These northern Wisconsin forest lands were the richest source of good timber anywhere within range of water shipment. The lands belonged to the Ojibwa, and the Northwest Territory Ordinance required the Indians’ consent if they were asked to cede their lands, so the U.S. government had to make a treaty with them to get them to relinquish their forest lands.2

The American Fur Company saw the occasion of an Indian treaty as an opportunity to acquire cash, something always valuable and in short supply. To make the most of this financial opportunity, the company’s objective was to get between the government and the Indians. The federal government was willing to pay the Indians substantial amounts of monies for the land, but, because the fur company had advanced them traps and other Western goods, the fur company held debts against the tribes. If the company could leverage the Indians’ dependency properly, it could slice off shares of the largest, most important and expensive real estate deals of the century, and be paid promptly in cash. The fur company intended to collect the Indians’ debts against the moneys allotted to them for sale of their lands. Some government officials supported the maneuver. Territorial Governor Cass favored the idea of using the Indians’ debt load as a way to persuade them to relinquish their land.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.