Economics of Good and Evil: The Quest for Economic Meaning from Gilgamesh to Wall Street

By Tomas Sedlacek | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In the Czech edition of this book, I wrote a very brief thank-you. That was not a good idea, so I will be more verbose this time. This book took many years to be born, innumerable conversations, hundreds of lectures, and countless books read over many a long night.

I owe this book to my two great teachers, Professor Milan Sojka (who led me in this work) and H. E. Milan “Mike” Miskovsky (who inspired me on the whole topic, many years ago). This book is dedicated to their memory. Neither is with us anymore.

I owe thanks to my great teacher, Professor Lubomír Mlčoch, whom I had the honor to work as a teaching assistant in his Business Ethics classes. I give my great thanks to Professor Karel Kouba, Professor Michal Mejstřík, and Professor Milan Žák for their leadership. I thank my 2010 class of Philosophy of Economics for their comments and thoughts.

I would like to thank Professor Catherine Langlois and Stanley Nollen from Georgetown University for teaching me how to write, and also Professor Howard Husock from Harvard University. I would like to express my great gratitude to Yale University for offering me a very gracious fellowship, during which I wrote a substantial part of the book. Thank you, Yale World Fellows, and all at Betts House.

Great thanks to the outstanding Jerry Root, for welcoming us to stay in his basement for a month to work on the book in perfect quiet, and for the pipe and smokes; David Sween, for making it all happen; and James Halteman, for all the books. Thank you to Dušan Drabina, for support in the hardest times.

There are many philosophers, economists, and thinkers to whom I feel honored to express thanks: Professor Jan Švejnar, Professor Tomáš Halík, Professor Jan Sokol, Professor Erazim Kohák, Professor Milan Machovec, Professor Zdeněk Neubauer, David Bartoň, Mirek Zámečník, and my younger brother, the great thinker Lukáš. You have my thanks and admiration. I can never express enough thanks to the rest of my family, especially my father and mother.

Now, the biggest thanks for the most specific help with this book goes to the team who cooperated on the Czech and English versions. Tomáš Brandejs, for ideas, faith, and courage; Jiří Nádoba, for editing and management; Betka Sočůvková, for patience and endurance; Milan Starý,

-xi-

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