The Judaizing Calvin: Sixteenth-Century Debates over the Messianic Psalms

By G. Sujin Pak | Go to book overview

2
Martin Luther
Literal Prophecies Redeployed

The vital importance of the Book of Psalms to Martin Luther may be seen throughout his lifetime in both his written works and his teaching. He turned to the Book of Psalms time and time again in the crucial stages of his theological development and the emergent understanding of his reforming movement. In the first years as a lecturer at Wittenberg, he began his lectures with the Book of Psalms (Dictata super psalterium, 1513-1515), commented on the seven penitential Psalms in 1517, and returned to a second set of lectures on the first twenty-two Psalms (Operationes in Psalmos) from 1518 to 1521. In 1521, while at the Wartburg, Luther wrote a commentary on Psalm 68. He preached on Psalm 26 in 1525 and on Psalm 112 in 1526. Also in 1526, Luther wrote a commentary, Four Psalms of Comfort, dedicated to Queen Mary of Hungary, who supported the cause of the Reformation. After several revised editions of his translation of the Old Testament in the 1520s, by 1531 Luther endeavored to write a new revision of the Psalter in order to express faithfully the message of the Psalms in the German tongue. As he states it, he undertook this amendment of his previous version of the Psalter “so that David might sound purely German.”1 Furthermore, in 1532, Luther wrote the Summaries of the Psalms, which were to accompany this new revision of the Psalter.

His return to the Book of Psalms in the 1530s brought forth several commentaries and sermons on individual Psalms as well. He

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Judaizing Calvin: Sixteenth-Century Debates over the Messianic Psalms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction 3
  • 1- Medieval and Late-Medieval Interpreters - The Legacy of Literal Prophecies of Christ 13
  • 2- Martin Luther - Literal Prophecies Redeployed 31
  • 3- Martin Bucer - Christological Readings through Historical Exegesis 55
  • 4- John Calvin - The Sufficiency of David 77
  • 5- The Judaizing Calvin - The Debate of Hunnius and Pareus 103
  • Conclusion 125
  • Notes 141
  • Select Bibliography 193
  • Index 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.