Financial Words You Should Know: Over 1,000 Essential Investment, Accounting, Real Estate and Tax Words

By Michele Cagan; P.T. Shank | Go to book overview

INVESTING

2% stop

A preset limit on the dollar amount an investor is willing to lose on an investment. Usually refers to a percentage of his entire portfolio, converted into dollars. For example, a 2% stop on a $200,000 portfolio means the investor would sell any security whose price declined by $4,000. Sometimes called a “money stop.”

See also: Stop order, Trailing stop

In order to help control losses, Zach made sure his broker always knew where
his
2% stopwas set.


52-week high

The top price for which a security has traded over the past year.

See also: Record high

Eric was lucky to have sold his stocks at their52-week high.


52-week low

The lowest price for which a security has traded over the past year.

See also: Record low

Sandra assured her clients that the52-week lowwas still more than they had
paid for the securities. In spite of the drop, they were still making money
.


Above the market

An order to buy or sell a security at a price that’s higher than the prevailing trade price. Often used when a trader expects a stock to break through resistance and go on an uptrend, in order to get in at the start of that uptrend.

See also: Resistance, Uptrend

The speculator told his broker to buyabove the marketbecause he expected
prices to rise in the next few months
.


Absolute Breadth Index (ABI)

A measure of the movement and volatility of the New York Stock Exchange (though it can be used to measure any exchange), regardless of which direction the market is moving. It is the difference between the number of advancing and declining issues. The larger the difference, the higher the market volatility, which may indicate a rollercoaster ride in the upcoming weeks.

See also: Advance/decline line, Breadth indicator

Investors held their breath as theABIstarted increasing because they knew
the market was going to start fluctuating rapidly
.

-135-

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