The Everything Guide to Government Jobs: A Complete Handbook to Hundreds of Lucrative Opportunities across the Nation

By James Mannion | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
So You Want to Work for
the Government

Many people today are cynical about the government, often rightly so. They see it as a hindrance to the average citizen rather than a help. It remains a fact, however, that the government is one of the largest employers in the country. The United States needs people with a desire to serve their country unselfishly. Civil servants have a chance to make small differences that can blossom into systemwide changes. As a bonus, there is often a great deal of stability in a government job.


Why Choose a Government Job?

Government jobs offer stability unmatched by most private companies. As long as there is a government, there will be government jobs. Often, people have the perception that these jobs pay little and offer little opportunity for advancement. The private sector thus seems like a better choice to many workers. But it all depends on one’s point of view. Government jobs can offer many people the chance to improve their pay and benefits, and for some, government jobs can be the stepping-stone to opportunities in the private sector.

Government jobs also give employees the opportunity to make a difference. Private-sector jobs might offer workers the chance to become wealthy, but civil service jobs offer financial rewards to employees, as well as opportunities to serve their country, state, or community while doing something they love. People who love the outdoors have the opportunity to work as park rangers, for example, protecting America’s landmarks while informing visitors of their significance. For those who want to help others more directly, the

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