The Everything Guide to Government Jobs: A Complete Handbook to Hundreds of Lucrative Opportunities across the Nation

By James Mannion | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
The Finest and the Bravest

If you have a desire to protect and serve your community and your fellow citizens, you may be interested in a career among the finest and the bravest—those men and women who catch the bad guys, put out the fires, and do the many other things that are necessary to keep the peace and save lives.


Police

Police work is a dangerous business. The pay is decent and the benefits are very good, as is the retirement plan, but you put your life on the line every day, and that day may very well be your last. There are law enforcement jobs at every level of government, from the FBI agent to the small-town sheriff.

Uniformed police officers are the ones you are most likely to encounter in your travels. They are in your community patrolling the streets, responding to calls for help, directing traffic, investigating crimes, and performing many other duties. Police officers also interact with the community to maintain good relations with the people they have sworn to protect and serve.

Most cities are divided into police precincts. There is a neighborhood station house in each precinct, and officers stationed there patrol and serve that part of town. The police force consists of uniformed officers who walk the beat or drive clearly marked cars, and plainclothes detectives. Ideally, the cop on the beat should establish a rapport with the businesses and residents of the community. Some officers work alone, but usually they patrol in pairs, either on foot or in their police cruisers.

Some public school districts have their own armed police force, as do modes of mass transit, including subways, railroads, and airports. Some officers specialize in fields of criminology, as is the case

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