The Everything Guide to Government Jobs: A Complete Handbook to Hundreds of Lucrative Opportunities across the Nation

By James Mannion | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Government Jobs in
Communications

Students in college often major in communications to prepare for careers in journalism, public relations, marketing and advertising, writing, and broadcasting. If you have an interest in both communications and government, you could consider a career as a political speechwriter or publicist. You might even end up one day as the White House press secretary! This chapter describes the tools you need to explore communications jobs in government.


Nonfiction and Copy Writing

Writers produce nonfiction text for books, magazines, trade journals, online publications, company newsletters, radio and television broadcasts, motion pictures, and advertisements. Many writers prepare material directly for the Internet. They may write for electronic newspapers or magazines or produce technical documentation that is available only online. They may write content for Web sites. These writers must be well versed in graphic design, page layout, and multimedia software. They should also be familiar with the interactive nature of the Internet in order to create a cyber-symphony of text, graphics, and sound.

Nonfiction writers either propose the subject matter or are assigned a subject by the editor or publisher. They research and find information about the given topic through various methods: personal knowledge/experience, library and Internet research, and interviews. They then select the material, organize it, and convey the information in a readable and coherent manner.

Copywriters come up with catchy advertising copy for use by publications or the broadcast media to promote the sale of goods

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