The Undead and Philosophy: Chicken Soup for the Soulless

By Richard Greene; K. Silem Mohammad | Go to book overview

Philosophers by Day

ROBERT ARP is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Southwest Minnesota State University, where it’s too damn cold for any of the Undead to haunt!

ADAM BARROWS is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of Minnesota. His research explores the connections between time and imperialism. Adam teaches courses in British and Postcolonial literature, and always worries about getting midterms graded before sunset.

NOEL CARROLL has reincarnated the ideas of so many dead philosophers that he has been re-animated as Andrew Mellon Professor of the Humanities at Temple University. Some of his tombstones include: The Philosophy of Horror, Beyond Aesthetics, Engaging the Moving Image, and, most recently, the Blackwell anthology, The Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures, co-edited with the vampire Jinhee Choi.

SIMON CLARK is an artist, musician, and writer from Britain. He graduated from Goldsmiths College in 2003 with an M.A. in Fine Art. He regularly performs a one-man show called Sad, Sad Songs of Wretchedness and Death in which he sings a repertoire of country ’n’ western dirges from inside his homemade coffin. With song titles such as Cold Hole for Your Bones, Surrender to the Worm, and Fm Doggone Dead and Fm OK, he has become something of a self-styled authority on all things morbid and miserable. If commercial success is an Undead figure rising from its grave, Simon’s body of work remains very much buried. He remains hopeful however that one day his obsession with death might actually earn him a living.

PHILLIP COLE is a member of the Undead until he gets coffee in the morning. After that he is Reader in Applied Philosophy at Middlesex University, London, but still retains the power to turn students into zombies during his lectures. During his research into the spirit world he tried to strike a happy medium. His book, The Myth of

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