Brothers among Nations: The Pursuit of Intercultural Alliances in Early America, 1580-1660

By Cynthia J. Van Zandt | Go to book overview

Epilogue
Captain Claiborne's Lost Isle

During the first half of the seventeenth century many alliances stretched hundreds of miles, far beyond any one group's territory or colony. Even when these connections were more narrowly contained, they were regularly directed at threats from outside the region. This book has taken a broad view in order to capture the full dimension of these collaborative efforts. By doing so, it becomes clear that intercultural partnerships shaped eastern North America from Iroquoia to the Chesapeake Bay and entangled everyone who was living there in one way or another. Actions and alliances in one region had an extremely important ripple effect on people in far distant places. Even when the connection was not direct, people were almost always linked to someone who did have an explicit relationship to the event or cooperative effort.

Intercultural alliances continued to shape the last century of the colonial period, but by the 1670s they had shifted west, north, and south. On the eastern seaboard intercultural partnerships and understandings became overwhelmed by escalating cycles of conflict and repeated Native American losses. But throughout the first half of the seventeenth century, people worked assiduously to create intercultural connections, sometimes with spectacular failure but occasionally with extraordinary success. For a new generation of Europeans on North America's eastern seaboard, however, the 1670s brought an end to the assumption that intercultural associations were either desirable or necessary.

The spread of epidemic disease, the dramatic increase in European populations in North America, and the shifts in political power on the East Coast all combined to end the era of widespread intercultural cooperation. Of course,

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brothers among Nations: The Pursuit of Intercultural Alliances in Early America, 1580-1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Prologue 3
  • Introduction 6
  • 1 - Mapping the Peoples of the World 19
  • 2 - Laying the Groundwork for Alliances 44
  • 3 - "You Called Him Father" 65
  • 4 - Alliance Making and the Struggle for the Soul of Plymouth Colony 86
  • 5 - Captain Claiborne's Alliance 116
  • 6 - Alliances of Necessity 137
  • 7 - Nations Intertwined 166
  • Epilogue - Captain Claiborne's Lost Isle 187
  • Notes 191
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.