Brothers among Nations: The Pursuit of Intercultural Alliances in Early America, 1580-1660

By Cynthia J. Van Zandt | Go to book overview

Notes

PROLOGUE

1. The commission to Colonel Washington and Major Allerton from Governor Berkeley and his council is reprinted in William and Mary Quarterly, 1st ser., 4 (1895): 86.

2. For the letter from Colonel John Washington and Major Isaac Allerton Jr. to Maryland's governor Charles Calvert and his council see “Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1671–1675,” in Archives of Maryland, Proceedings of the Council of Maryland 1671–1681, ed. William Hand Browne (Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1896), 48–49.

3. For some of the depositions attesting to Allerton Jr.’s and Washington's conduct in the affair of the murdered Susquehannocks see Lyon Tyler, “Col. John Washington. Further Details of His Life from the Records of Westmoreland Co. Virginia,” William and Mary Quarterly, 1st ser., 2 (1893): 38–43. The depositions all contend that a Maryland officer named Major Truman ordered the execution of the Susquehannock leaders and that he had them put to death without Washington's or Allerton's support.


INTRODUCTION

1. Captain John Smith, A Map of Virginia: With a description of the Countrey, the Commodities, People, Government and Religion (London, 1612).

2. See, for example, The History of Cartography, vol. 2, bk. 3, Cartography in the Traditional African, American, Arctic, Australian, and Pacific Societies, ed. David Woodward and G. Malcolm Lewis (University of Chicago Press, 1998).

3. See, for example, ibid., vol. 1 and vol. 2, bk. 3.

4. For related works that emphasize the connections between mapping and culture and between mapping and ethnography see Richard Helgerson, Forms of Nationhood:

-191-

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Brothers among Nations: The Pursuit of Intercultural Alliances in Early America, 1580-1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Prologue 3
  • Introduction 6
  • 1 - Mapping the Peoples of the World 19
  • 2 - Laying the Groundwork for Alliances 44
  • 3 - "You Called Him Father" 65
  • 4 - Alliance Making and the Struggle for the Soul of Plymouth Colony 86
  • 5 - Captain Claiborne's Alliance 116
  • 6 - Alliances of Necessity 137
  • 7 - Nations Intertwined 166
  • Epilogue - Captain Claiborne's Lost Isle 187
  • Notes 191
  • Index 235
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