Staging Shakespearean Theatre: The Essential Guide to Selecting, Interpreting, Producing and Directing Shakespeare

By Elaine Adams Novak | Go to book overview

Preface

The purpose of this book is to offer an easy-to-understand guide for community, college or high school directors and students who want to stage a Shakespearean play.

William Shakespeare’s works hold the record for the most films and stage performances in more languages than those of any other dramatist. Through the years many of us have viewed great actors in renowned Shakespearean plays on the professional stage and in films; consequently, some directors of amateur productions may want to try working with the best dramatic writing available, despite the difficulties inherent in these works.

Shakespearean plays are not easy to stage and many directors—both amateur and professional—are afraid to try them. They require more research, analysis and study than modern plays. They need larger casts and contain more scenes than most amateur directors are accustomed to and, of course, they contain poetic, archaic language that can be difficult to understand. They often call for singing, dancing, playing musical instruments, fighting and special effects. Also, they demand from directors imaginative interpretations. This book takes up these and other problems and tries to demystify the process of staging Shakespeare’s plays.

Part One of this book deals with the development of playwriting in the Elizabethan-Jacobean era. (Elizabethan concerns the time period of 1558 to 1603 when Queen Elizabeth I reigned England, while Jacobean refers to 1603 to 1625 when England was ruled by King James I. Shakespeare lived from 1564 to 1616, during both regimes.) Part One also offers a description of the theatres, the acting and the direction of plays at this time. In addition, it touches on the life and works of Shakespeare and other famous writers of this era.

Part Two discusses preparing a Shakespearean play for production today: selecting a play, researching, analyzing and interpreting your choice, acquiring a staff of workers to assist you and supervising their work.

Part Three describes auditions, casting, rehearsals and performances.

Part Four gives detailed information for preparing and directing Romeo and Juliet. The necessary research, analysis and arriving at an interpretation are described. A complete script of Romeo and Juliet is included with suggested blocking, lighting, sound, possible cuts and meaning of unusual words. There is also advice on costuming, makeup, scenery, properties, lighting, music and sound.

The appendix, which gives information about major Shakespearean plays, is followed by a list of books for further reading.

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Staging Shakespearean Theatre: The Essential Guide to Selecting, Interpreting, Producing and Directing Shakespeare
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 185

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.