For the Freedom of Her Race: Black Women and Electoral Politics in Illinois, 1877-1932

By Lisa G. Materson | Go to book overview

Index
Abbott, Robert S., 98
Abolitionism, 21, 39, 45
Addams, Jane, 82
African Americans. See Black men; Black women; Chicago; Churches; Middleclass blacks; Poor blacks; Southern migrants; Voting—by black men
Alabama, 78, 105, 116, 154
Alcohol. See Prohibition
Alpha Suffrage Club, 87, 93, 95, 96, 187
AME Church. See Churches
AME Church Review, 37, 51, 168
American Federation of Labor, 24
AME Zion Quarterly Review, 57
Anderson, Annie Laurie, 121
Anderson, J. C., 91
Anderson, Louis, 96, 189
Anti-Lynching Crusaders, 121–22, 136–37, 144, 271 (n. 45)
Antilynching movement: and AntiLynching Crusaders, 121–22, 136–37, 144, 271 (n. 45); and Ida B. Wells Club, 28; Illinois antilynching law, 204–5; Kentucky’s antilynching law, 72; and NAACP, 112, 122; and National Association of Colored Women, 112, 113, 114, 119–20, 122, 124, 234; and racism, not rape, as cause of lynching, 30, 112, 121– 22; and Republican Party, ‘58, 81, 109, 112–13, 118–22, 125, 128–31, 134, 148; and Wells-Barnett, 30–31, 34, 112, 118– 20, 153. See also Dyer Antilynching Bill Anti-Saloon League (ASL), 155, 296 (n. 209)
Arizona, 146, 266 (n. 170)
Arkansas, 1–2, 6–7, 8, 77–78
Armstrong, Louis, 173
ASL. See Anti-Saloon League
Atchison, Rena Michaels, 52
Atlanta Compromise, 56
Austin, J. C., 224
Bailey v. Alabama, 105
Bainum, Eleanor, 207
Baltimore Afro-American, 165
Bankhead amendment, 289 (n. 90)
Baptist Church. See Churches
Barnett, Claude, 181
Barnett, Ferdinand, 32, 86, 142, 205, 220, 289–90 (n. 96)
Bates, Beth Tompkins, 214
Bearden, Bessye, 164–65, 167, 170, 182
Beatty, Blanche Armwood, 124, 271 (n. 45)
Bee. See Chicago Bee
Benedict College, 100
Bennett, Ruth, 120
Berry, Ella G.: and battles with southern white supremacists, 62; and black male suffrage in Kentucky, 62, 72–73; church membership of, 89, 99; and Cornell Charity Club, 84; daughter of, 70, 84; and Democratic Party, 233; and DePriest’s congressional campaign, 215; domestic work by, 70; early life and parents of, 67–71, 258 (n. 37), 259 (nn. 43, 47); education of, 63, 67, 69; and fraternal movement, 69–70, 84, 99, 215–16, 259 (n. 49); home state of, 62, 63; in

-321-

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