Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues

By William Ferris | Go to book overview

INDEX
Note: Page numbers in italic type indicate illustrations.
Ace, Johnny, 185
African roots: drumming and, 68; music and, 48; one-strand guitar and, 47; religion and, 178; work chants and, 77
Afro-American studies program (Yale University), 175, 187
Allen, Bill “Hoss,” 161, 186
Allen, Nathaniel “Al,” 258
Allen, Velma Thomas, 258
“All Night Long,” 229
American Folk Blues Festival, 181
Amite County, Miss., 59
Ammons, Albert, 197
Andrew College, 258
Annual Blues Music Awards, 257
Anshe Chesed Temple (Vicksburg), 5
Apollo Theater (New York), 185
Appleton, William, 2, 3
Arcola, Miss., 80
Assassinations, 5, 125–26, 130, 167
Ba Benzele pygmie yodel, 48
“Baby, Please Don’t Go,” 114
Baby Sister, 225
Banjo, 89, 92
Baptism, 22, 26, 28, 205
Baptist church, 17, 100, 191–92
Barbecue Bob, 193, 201
Barbershop boogie-woogie, 143, 157, 159
Barfield, Gladys, 2
Basie, Count, 181
Bass fiddle, 179–80, 181
Bass kettle drum, 71
B. B. King Blues Collection (University of Mississippi), 187–88
B. B. King Blues Festival, 189
B. B. King Blues Museum (Indianola), 189, 256, 258
B. B. King Recording Studio (Mississippi Valley State University), 257
B. B. King’s Blues Club (Memphis), 257
“Beale St. Blues,” 200
Beale Street (Memphis), 170–73, 200, 257
Beale Streeters, 185
Bennett, Jack, 190
Bennett Furniture Company, 157
Big Black River, 1
Big Daddy Show, The (radio program), 162
Big Six Barbershop (Clarksdale), 157, 158, 159
Big Three Trio, 178, 181
Bilbo, Theodore, 134–35
Biloxi, Miss., 158
Black Boy (Wright), 206
Black church, 203, 205–21; baptism and, 22, 26, 28, 205; congregants’ responses and, 15, 169, 208, 223; music and, 191–93; opposition to blues and, 97, 113–14, 147; Sanctified vs. Baptist customs and, 192–93; sermons and, 126, 206, 207–8, 212– 21; women’s role in, 57, 59. See also Gospel music; Hymns; Preachers; Religious faith; Rose Hill Church; Spirituals
Black Delta, Part 1 (film), 225
Black Delta, Part 2 (film), 207
“Black Dog” section (Leland), 105
“Black Snake Moan,” 179
Black Snake Moan (film), 257
Bland, Bobby Blue, 185, 257
Blassingame, John, 187
Blinder, Rabbi Alvin, 5
“Blowing the bottle,” 47–48, 51
Blue Room (Vicksburg), 179
Blues: B. B. King’s importance to, 175, 185–202; Beale Street and, 170–73, 200, 257; black cultural significance of, 258; black shame about, 158, 200–201; as black survival tool, 184; call and response and, 222– 24; changes in view of, 256–58; as communication, 190, 194, 202; devil linked with, 113–14, 147–48, 177–78, 179; Willie Dixon’s importance to, 175, 177–84; educational programs and, 187–88, 256, 257; gospel mixed with, 169; as inspiration, 184; jazz and, 196; joy and, 202; offshoots of, 200; oral tradition and, 177, 190–91; popular recognition of, 256–58; racial strife and, 167; rhythms and, 184; roots of, 4, 8, 101–2, 113, 147, 190–91, 201, 255; as sin, 147; as singing feelings, 76, 114–15, 137, 139–40, 147, 148, 162, 168–69, 173, 178, 183, 190, 194; verbal interplay and, 223–24, 226–53; WOKJ radio broadcasts of, 160–69; women as theme of, 114, 120, 139, 168–69, 173, 177; young people and, 200–202
Blues Archive (University of Mississippi), 187–88, 257
Blues City Café (Memphis), 257
Blues clubs, 103, 203, 255, 257
Blues Foundation (Memphis), 257
Blues from the Delta (Ferris), 256, 257
Blues history, 9, 175–202; slavery and, 190, 201, 255; University of Mississippi archive, 187–88, 257
Blues parties. See House parties Blues programs, 257–58
Blues talk, 222, 223–24; transcript, 226–53
Blues towns and cities, 8–9, 103–74,

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