Narrative of William W. Brown, An American Slave

By William Wells Brown | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX.

I HAD been in jail but a short time when I heard that my master was sick, and nothing brought more joy to my heart than that intelligence. I prayed fervently for him—not for his recovery, but for his death. I knew he would be exasperated at having to pay for my apprehension, and knowing his cruelty, I feared him. While in jail, I learned that my sister Elizabeth, who was in prison when we left the city, had been carried off four days before our arrival.

I had been in jail but a few hours when three negro-traders, learning that I was secured thus for running away, came to my prison-house and looked at me, expecting that I would be offered for sale. Mr. Mansfield, the man who owned mother, came into the jail as soon as Mr. Jones, the man who arrested us, informed him that he had brought her back. He told her that he would not whip her, but would sell her to a negro-trader, or take her to New Orleans himself. After being in jail [Page 75]about one week, master sent a man to take me our of jail, and send me home. I was taken out and carried home, and the old man was well enough to sit up. He had me brought into the room where he was, and as I entered, he asked me where I had been? I told him I had acted according to his orders. He had told me to look for a master, and I had been to look for one. He answered that he did not tell me to go to Canada to look for a master. I told him that as I had served him faithfully, and had been the means of putting a number of hundreds of dollars into his pocket, I thought I had a right to my liberty. He said he had promised my father that I should not be sold to supply the New Orleans market, or he would sell me to a negro-trader.

I was ordered to go into the field to work, and was closely watched by the overseer during the day, and locked up at night. The overseer gave me a severe whipping on the second day that I was in the field. I had been at

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Narrative of William W. Brown, An American Slave
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • About This Edition 3
  • Narrative of William W. Brown, an American Slave 6
  • Preface 8
  • Narrative 17
  • Chapter I 18
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter III 25
  • Chapter IV 30
  • Chapter V 33
  • Chapter VI 42
  • Chapter VII 44
  • Chapter VIII 48
  • Chapter IX 51
  • Chapter X 57
  • Chapter XI 60
  • Chapter XII 67
  • From the Liberty Bell of 1848 74
  • Flight of the Bondman 77
  • Freedom’s Star 79
  • Lament of the Fugitive Slave 80
  • Appendix 83
  • Testimonials 106
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