Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia

By Aaron Sheehan-Dean | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

History is often said to be a solitary pursuit—so much time sitting in archives and writing alone. I am happy that my experience has been otherwise. From the beginning of graduate school through to my current position at the University of North Florida, collegiality and camaraderie have defined my development as a historian. Accordingly, it is with profound gratitude that I take this opportunity to thank those people who helped me complete this project. I would like to express my appreciation to the staffs of the special collections departments at the following institutions: the University of Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute, Duke University, the Library of Virginia, the Henry E. Huntington Library, the U.S. Army Military History Institute at Carlisle Barracks, the Southern Historical Collection at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and, most of all, the Virginia Historical Society. I would also like to thank Mary Roy Edwards, who graciously arranged for me to include the images of John and Mary Jones.

The Virginia Historical Society granted me a Mellon Fellowship to support my research in its massive and remarkably well-documented holdings on Civil War Virginia. Frances Pollard and Nelson Lankford ensured that the week was productive and enjoyable. Charles Bryan organized an opportunity for me to share my research with the knowledgeable staff there in what proved to be a timely incentive for me to organize my thoughts. My thanks to them all. A Fletcher Jones fellowship from the Henry E. Huntington Library provided a month of research and writing time in Pasadena. Susi Krasnoo expertly facilitated my visit. John Rhodehamel guided me through the Huntington’s trove of resources. My thanks to them and to Robert Ritchie for the financial support and for creating such a dynamic and inspiring program for scholars. I received financial support from a variety of sources at the University of Virginia, including travel money from the Corcoran Department of History and the Graduate School. Most importantly, a Dissertation Year Teaching Fellowship awarded by the Faculty Senate made the last year of writing possible. I would also like to thank Mary Jane Barnwell, Elizabeth Bradley, and the staff at the Island Bookstore in Mackinaw City, Michigan, where a good part of this book was composed.

The Office of Academic Affairs at the University of North Florida provided

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