Wounds of Returning: Race, Memory, and Property on the Postslavery Plantation

By Jessica Adams | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

On my journeys through New Orleans, walking or driving with the windows rolled down because my air conditioning was always broken, the city seemed to murmur things—messages, questions—that I sensed were urgent and profound. I needed to try to decode them, though I knew these mysteries must be infinite. At Tulane, Supriya Nair helped ground my flights of fancy in scholarly rigor, and her kindness has been a still point throughout graduate school and beyond. Rebecca Mark revealed expanses of creative possibility and sponsored their exploration. Felipe Smith offered an oasis of calm, blues and jazz floating from his office like a smoky haze; down the hall, Molly Travis was always ready with a warm welcome and an ideal teaching assignment. Joseph Roach introduced me to the antidiscipline of performance studies, and his embrace of the poignancy of history showed me that scholarly work could be poetry. Katy Coyle and Alecia Long took the time to share their unmatched knowledge of Storyville with both me and my students at Tulane. Wilbert Rideau and Ashanti Witherspoon, two extraordinary men, shed light on life inside Angola. At the University of Michigan, Patricia Yaeger generously read and commented on early drafts of this work, lending her brilliance to help me see my way through it. Charles Reagan Wilson at the University of Mississippi was a source of unwavering support for the project, for which I can never thank him enough. When I met him in Oxford, I immediately recognized a fellow connoisseur of the wild and strange in southern popular culture, and I have been incredibly fortunate to have him as an editor. The book benefited immensely from the comprehensive critiques of Russ Castronovo and an anonymous reader for the University of North Carolina Press. David Perry encouraged its completion across the varied landscapes of Georgia,

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