The Literate Eye: Victorian Art Writing and Modernist Aesthetics

By Rachel Teukolsky | Go to book overview

INDEX
Note: Page numbers in italics indicate illustrations.
Abrams, M. H., 61
The Mirror and the Lamp, 40, 244n21, 255n65, 256n74
abstract expressionism
formalism and, 4–5, 9, 236–38, 242n6
post-impressionism and, 193, 232
Ackermann, Rudolph, 12, 246n41
Ackermann’s Repository of the Arts, 101 Strand (Pugin and Rowlandson), 13
Adam (Newman), 236, 237
Adams, James Eli, 273–74nn102–3
aestheticism
accusations against, 109–10, 122
avant-garde and, 146–48
Bürger’s critique of, 102
characteristic artforms of, 108
class confusion and, 129–30, 133–34
color and, 176
commodity culture and, 130, 132–33, 176, 178
decadence and, 184
formalism and, 66, 102–3, 106–7, 108, 126–30, 136, 145
gender transgressions and, 129–30
in literature, 108, 141–45, 269n20
Pater’s writings on, 23, 101–3, 108–9, 136–40
political subtexts of, 149–50
satires of, 127–29
urbanity and, 142
vogue for, 103, 127–30, 132–36, 153
aesthetics. See also formalism; Victorian aesthetics; specific names, schools, and subjects
art criticism distinguished from, 15–16
art reproductions and, 19
comparative anthropology and, 24
discipline of, 4, 15–16
eighteenth-century, 31–32, 49
German, 4, 8, 9, 17, 47, 241n2, 255n65
historiography of, 4–7, 212, 242n7, 243n13
Marxist critiques of, 244n23
mimetic theories of, 40, 45, 61–62, 210
perception and, 51–52, 63
postmodernism, 102, 238–39, 258n105, 284n93
purity and, 9–10, 63
typology and, 137–39
African art, 24, 90–91, 194, 212, 214–19, 229–30, 290nn73–75, 291n79
Albert, Prince of Wales, 65, 66, 67–68, 70, 88, 261n17, 263n53
Alberti, Leon Battista, 16
Albinus, 37
Alison, Archibald, 51, 256n76
Allen, Grant
on Celtic art, 284n97
The Colour-Sense, 162
“Dissecting a Daisy,” 162, 280n34
“A Mountain Tulip,” 163
“The Origin of Fruits,” 163–64, 280–81n41
Physiological Aesthetics, 162
“The Political Pupa,” 164
popular science writings of, 23, 151, 162–63, 178
Ruskin attacked by, 163, 280n39
and socialism, 164
Spencer’s influence on, 163, 280n33
The Woman Who Did, 184
Alma-Tadema, Lawrence, 130
Amazon, The (Kiss sculpture), 75, 76
Anderson, Amanda, 7, 26
Anderson, Perry, 278n4, 278n8

-297-

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