Straight Talk on Writing: 20 Conversations with Authors about the Craft

By Scott Francis | Go to book overview

Karen S. Wiesner

“Working in stages is
essential for keeping my
creativity at its peak.”
Karen S. Wiesner is an accomplished author who has published fifty-six books in the past ten years and has eleven more releases forthcoming spanning many categories and formats. Karen’s books have been nominated for and/or won sixty-eight awards, and they cover such genres as women’s fiction, romance, mystery/police procedural/cozy, suspense, paranormal, futuristic, gothic, inspirational, thriller, horror, and action/adventure. She also writes children’s books, poetry, and writing reference titles such as her bestseller, First Draft in 30 Days.Interview conducted by Kelly Nickell
What piece of advice that
you received over the
course of your career has
had the biggest impact on
your success?
Years before I was published, a critique partner of mine told me that my stories read like someone trying to cram too much into a suitcase—that I should follow my heart with every story instead of trying to fit everything in that was popular or currently selling. She was absolutely right in that I was wasting all my time trying to follow trends, trying to give publishers what I thought they wanted. I never got anywhere that way.That critique partner’s advice to follow my heart freed me completely. Once I’d given myself permission not to conform and stand behind the traditional boundaries, I was able to write my books the way they needed to be written. I only worried about who would buy it or read it later, when the book was done. Doing this was the only way I could love each book and feel good about the labor I put into it—and that’s more important to me than just giving a publisher what she wants without having a heart for it myself. This is not to say that I don’t or won’t work with my editors on specific revisions. A good editor can make a book stronger. I know that. But the most important part of being a writer to me is being true to myself and my fans with each book I produce.
What’s a common mistake
you see writers make?
Not working in stages. I’m never working on one project at a time straight through. I think a writer is always fresher when working on manuscripts in stages. Plus, I’m always working six months to a year ahead of releases so I’m never rushed and can always be working on new projects.The way I see it, there are several very distinct stages in writing a book… they include:
1. Brainstorming
2. Outlining
3. Setting the outline aside
4. Writing the story
5. Setting the novel aside

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Straight Talk on Writing: 20 Conversations with Authors about the Craft
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 73

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.