Recruiting, Interviewing, Selecting & Orienting New Employees

By Diane Arthur | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Types of Employment
Interviews

Nick Dawkins is the HR manager for Clarisse Inc., a communications company with about nine hundred employees, located outside of Boston, Massachusetts. He currently has several openings to fill, including one for a business office supervisor. Nick has cast a wide recruitment net, using a variety of sources. As a result, he has identified several possibilities, all of whom look impressive on paper. Nick is ready to begin the interview process. He knows he must first carefully screen the applicants before bringing them in for interviews. To do this, he plans on conducting either face-to-face exploratory, telephone, or video screening interviews. Assuming there is continued interest, Nick intends to schedule each applicant for a series of comprehensive interviews: first, there will be the HR interview with himself; next, there will be either a departmental interview with the business office manager or a panel interview with the business office manager and other selected managers; finally, there might be a peer interview with business office colleagues and other supervisors.

By selecting a combination of different types of interviews, Nick is confident he will find the most suitable business office supervisor for Clarisse.


Exploratory Interviews

The purpose of a face-to-face exploratory interview is to establish continued interest on both sides and to determine preliminary job suitability. Assuming these two conditions are satisfied, the next step is to set up a job-specific interview. Exploratory interviews should not serve as substitutes for the in-depth job-specific interview; that is, interviewers should not make decisions to hire based on the exploratory meeting. On the other hand, exploratory interviews can screen out applicants in whom you definitely have no further interest.

What distinguishes an exploratory interview is the amount of time allotted to asking questions. Interviewers must focus on key job-related issues—usually in a period of fifteen to twenty minutes for nonexempt applicants and twenty to thirty

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