Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

By Brad Karsh; Courtney Templin | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION:
NOT BETTER, NOT WORSE—
JUST DIFFERENT

“Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one
that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.”

—George Orwell

I will never forget the day I came across my first leaderless team.

In my days as a Vice President/Director of Talent Acquisition at Leo Burnett, I was in charge of recruiting at all levels, but my main focus was entry-level candidates. I had the pleasure of reading more than 10,000 student resumes and interviewing more than 1,000 collegians. One of the standard interview questions I asked was, “Tell me about a group project you worked on in college.” I used this question when hiring for the account management department because a huge part of the job was working with diverse groups within the company. We wanted to hire people who had the ability to manage projects and lead teams.

I was seeking candidates who said that they took the role of leader within the group. I would then probe them about their ability to work on diverse teams, handle conflict effectively, and drive results for the group. I must have posed this question hundreds of times in my quest to find the best candidates.

I still remember the day it all changed. It was in the spring of 2001, and I was interviewing a student from Princeton. I asked my standard

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