Manager 3.0: A Millennial's Guide to Rewriting the Rules of Management

By Brad Karsh; Courtney Templin | Go to book overview

2
MILLENNIALS
DEFINED

“The ones who are crazy enough to think they can change the world
are the ones that do
.

—Apple Inc.

Millennials, Generation Y, Generation Me, Echo Boomers, Net Generation, and Trophy Generation. Your generation has quite a few terms of endearment, and you rightfully deserve a lot of attention. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, by 2015, there will be more millennials than boomers in the workplace. Watch out, the millennials are coming!

Undoubtedly, as a manager, you will oversee fellow millennials at some point in your career. First, this chapter will help you understand the driving forces, assets, and liabilities of millennials so you can better manage them. Second, it will give you great insight on how other generations view your generation and how you can successfully bridge the gap between the hierarchal management style of senior executives and the more casual, collaborative approach of your peers.

The millennial generation is comprised of more than 75 million Americans born between 1981 and 2000. As said earlier, it is hard to speak on behalf of more than 75 million people. Certainly, there will be exceptions. If you already are a millennial manager, then you may be on the “older” end of the generation. You are what we call a “cusper”—an individual on the edge of two different generations. You may find that you relate to some attributes of millennials and some characteristics of Xers. If you’re a cusper, you probably are mad that the Lady Gaga song is stuck in your head!

-19-

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