Army and Empire: British Soldiers on the American Frontier, 1758-1775

By Michael N. McConnell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book took longer to complete than I had originally planned and, as sometimes happens, it took a decidedly different turn from what I had originally intended. That it reached completion at all owes a great deal to the kindness and generosity of many institutions and individuals. Research trips to the William L. Clements Library and the David Library of the American Revolution were both profitable and enjoyable thanks to Professors John Dann and David Fowler and their capable staffs. I also owe thanks to the David Library for a research fellowship. The Alderman Library, University of Virginia; the British Library; the Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library; the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania; the Oneida Country Historical Society in New York; the National Archives of Canada; the National Army Museum in London; and the Scottish Records Office all cheerfully supplied materials and answered queries about their collections. Brian Dunnigan, formerly executive director of the Old Fort Niagara Association, generously shared his own work and research files at an early stage of my research and has since been of particular help as the head of research and publications at the Clements Library.

The Fort Ligonier Museum in Ligonier, Pennsylvania, has become something of a second home over the past few years. Not only have I learned much about British soldiers in America from the director, Martin West, and curators Penny West and Shirley Iscrupe, I have always enjoyed a warm welcome and generous hospitality. Marty shared his impressive knowledge of eighteenth-century fortification and military technology, while Shirley proved to be a most valuable guide through the museum’s archaeological collections. Fort Ligonier also provided venues for sharing ideas and research, as did the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, David Curtis Skaggs of Bowling Green University, Warren Hofstra of Shenandoah University, and the Organization of American Historians.

James Merrell was generous enough to read the entire manuscript at a critical stage; his insights and editorial skills spared me any number of errors

-xi-

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Army and Empire: British Soldiers on the American Frontier, 1758-1775
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - The British Occupation of the West 1
  • 2 - Frontier Fortresses 32
  • 3 - Military Society on the Frontier 53
  • 4 - The Material Lives of Frontier Soldiers 73
  • 5 - The World of Work 82
  • 6 - Diet and Foodways 100
  • 7 - Physical and Mental Health 114
  • Conclusion 145
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 207
  • In the Studies in War, Society, and the Military Series 212
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