Army and Empire: British Soldiers on the American Frontier, 1758-1775

By Michael N. McConnell | Go to book overview

4
The Material Lives of Frontier Soldiers

On September 20, 1758, the part of Gen. John Forbes’s army encamped at Loyal Hannon—later Fort Ligonier—took part in a ritual common in eighteenth-century armies. Less than a week earlier, on September 14, a detached force of some eight hundred men led by Maj. James Grant of the 77th Highland Regiment had come to grief outside Fort Duquesne. Attacked at dawn by the French garrison and its native allies, Grant’s force had been overwhelmed, its survivors streaming back to the Loyal Hannon camp. Now an auction was to be held to dispose of the personal belongings of officers and men listed as dead or missing in the battle. Among the property of three officers of Lt. Col. Henry Bouquet’s Royal American Regiment were three “Port Mantles,” boots, several pairs of stockings and “Breeches,” shirts, handkerchiefs, gilt spurs, overcoats, and regimental clothing. The thirty-three noncommissioned officers and private soldiers who died left behind little more than their knapsacks, “coaths,” “4 pair of Breeches,” and 2 “old West coaths [waistcoats].”1

The contrast could not have been more striking: officers taking the field with trunks filled with personal belongings; soldiers carrying their few possessions on their backs. It is a picture that conforms well to the modern popular picture of early modern armies, especially the wide social and economic gulf that existed between officers and common soldiers: the haves and the have-nots. That officers burdened themselves—and their soldierservants—with clothing, food, furniture, and the other trappings of genteel living cannot be denied. When Lt. Emanuel Hesse died in late February 1759, he left behind effects ranging from dozens of pairs of stockings, shirts, nightshirts, and other clothes to a “Spanish grammar,” “German Bibles,” and a “Smale germain flute.” Eighteen-year-old Ens. Jeremy Lister prepared for service in America by collecting a small mountain of goods. To his 30 pairs of silk stockings (nearly enough to supply Lister’s entire company of the 10th Foot), curling iron, nightcaps, watch, and spurs, he added a “Camp Bedstead and Bedding,” a musket, sword and powder horn, handkerchiefs, hair ribbons, soap, and other “odd things,” as well as trunks to hold it all

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Army and Empire: British Soldiers on the American Frontier, 1758-1775
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - The British Occupation of the West 1
  • 2 - Frontier Fortresses 32
  • 3 - Military Society on the Frontier 53
  • 4 - The Material Lives of Frontier Soldiers 73
  • 5 - The World of Work 82
  • 6 - Diet and Foodways 100
  • 7 - Physical and Mental Health 114
  • Conclusion 145
  • Notes 153
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 207
  • In the Studies in War, Society, and the Military Series 212
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 213

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.