Five Empresses: Court Life in Eighteenth-Century Russia

By Evgenii V. Anisimov; Kathleen Carroll | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The author wishes to express his gratitude to those who worked on the English edition of his book. Kathleen Carroll, the primary translator of the Russian, had the sensitivity and skill to keep the lively style of the original. She benefited from the assistance of a native speaker Nikolai Konstantinovich Sergeev to get the gist of the often colloquial and idiomatic Russian style of the original. The editor and manager of the project, Iurii Sergeevich Pamfilov, ensured the accuracy and literary quality of the translation. Clarifying with the author the most knotty questions, he showed real linguistic intuition. Rachel Williams of the Binghamton University Center for Research in Translation translated many quotations from eighteenth-century French into good modern English. With patience and precision Irina Dekopova corrected on the computer a translation that went through several stages of editing and revision. Natalia Zheleznaia expertly transferred to computer printed illustrations from nineteenth-century editions, so that we could publish images of some of the places and the people appearing in our history. The translation and literary agency (Bronze Horseman) stinted neither time nor resources to produce a first-rate translation. Heather Ruland Staines, history editor at Praeger-Greenwood Publishers, recognized the general and scholarly interest of the work, and arranged courteously and efficiently for its publication. House of Equations, Inc. skillfully turned the manuscript into book form, solving problems with alacrity and meeting a difficult schedule.

-v-

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