Five Empresses: Court Life in Eighteenth-Century Russia

By Evgenii V. Anisimov; Kathleen Carroll | Go to book overview

Index
Italicized page numbers indicate an illustration
abdication, of Peter III, 283
Academy of Arts, founding of, 222
Academy of Sciences, 44; founding of, 114
Aleksandr Nevskii Monastery, 137
Aleksandr Pavlovich (Catherine the Great’s grandson, Aleksandr I), 343– 344, 347
Aleksandra Pavlovna (Catherine the Great’s granddaughter), 353
Aleksei Petrovich (son of Peter the Great and Evdokia Lopukhina), 25, 28; alienated from father, 27–28; character of, 26; murder of, 28–29
America, 327
Anichkov Palace, 218
Anna Ioannovna (Duchess of Courland, Empress of Russia), 59; and affairs of state, 98–99; appearance of, 83, 123; atmosphere at court of, 92; and autocracy, 79, 88, 100; birth of, 62; childhood and education of, 64; and court jesters, 89; fearing rivalry of Elizabeth, 186; hostile toward Elizabeth, 184—185; impoverished widowhood of, in Courland, 68–69; and Menshikov, 70; moving to St. Petersburg, 65; and myth of German bias, 107; relationship of, with Biron, 96–97; relationship of, with her mother, Tsaritsa Praskovia, 65; relationship of, with uncle, Peter the Great, 69–70; seeking Catherine I’s help, 70; sickness and death of, 124, 143; signing Privy Council’s conditions, 61; and succession, 84; tearing up Privy Council’s conditions, 81, 82; vengeance of, on Privy Council, 117; wedding of, 67
Anna Leopol’dovna, 138; bearing a son named as heir to throne, 142; children of, 167–169, 171; confronting Elizabeth, 172–173, 177; death of, 159–160; failing to act, 172; as heir, 84; isolation of, 140; marriage of, to Anton Ulrich, 142; named

-369-

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