The Grateful Dead and Philosophy: Getting High Minded about Love and Haight

By Steven Gimbel | Go to book overview

FOREWORD
Half Baseball Game,
Half Church

One of the standard jokes about Deadheads is that they’re determined to find cosmic significance in every aspect of the band they love so much. Every lyric, song choice, onstage utterance, and even random glance—-Jerry looked right at me!—was mined for arcane meanings by scruffy fans determined to believe that the universe is a conspiracy working in their favor.

It’s not hard to imagine why several generations of kids raised in American suburbia would be eager to join a subculture that held out the promise of Eternal Secrets Revealed during a night of serious partying and adventurous rock ‘n’ roll. What’s harder to understand for non-Deadheads is how often these secrets actually were revealed in the course of a show. I’m not talking about the stoned flights of fancy that evaporate in the harsh light of morning. I’m talking about the kinds of durable insights that are the foundation of any meaningful, creative, and responsible human life. For decades, Dead shows provided me and thousands of others with an opportunity to check in, take stock, set aside the distractions of daily life, and tune up the internal navigation system for the long and unpredictable journey ahead.

These insights were not given by the band to its audience, as esoteric teachings might be passed on by a guru to an earnest student. The band members had no special claim on enlightenment, and were put off by the notion that they were anything other than reasonably capable and occasionally hardworking musicians who had lucked into a good gig. But somehow, the totality of the experience—the music, the people, and, on those special nights, the psychedelics—provided a setting where it became easier to sift the wheat from the chaff and remember what’s truly important.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Grateful Dead and Philosophy: Getting High Minded about Love and Haight
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 250

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.