The Grateful Dead and Philosophy: Getting High Minded about Love and Haight

By Steven Gimbel | Go to book overview
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Playin’ in the Band

RANDALL AUXIER is gratefully alive, although he can’t be sure it’s better than the alternative. He teaches philosophy at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale—at least that’s what he does when he isn’t playing Grateful Dead covers, and covers of Grateful Dead covers, in local bars, for small audiences who won’t remember whether the show was any good, which is just as well. His father has wanted him to cut his hair since 1969, but it isn’t going to happen, although both have recently noticed a worrisome touch of grey.

PETER BRADLEY is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at McDaniel College. A graduate of Antioch College, he spent the late 1990s running a series of failed dot-coms in Portland, Oregon, where he became well acquainted with the copyleft tradition. While he is keenly interested in the conflict between intellectual property and the Internet’s anarchic ethos, his primary research is in trying to understand the philosophical implications of the possibility of other creatures’ perception: from the fact that birds see colors that we cannot to the possibility of other sensory modalities such as pit viper’s infrared sense and shark’s electrical sense.

JOHANNES BULHOF is Professor of Philosophy at McNeese State University in Lake Charles, Louisiana. His interests include the history of philosophy, the philosophy of language, and logic. He blames his interest in the Grateful Dead on the corrupting influence of his older brother, Dr. Justin Bulhof, who took him to his first show at Manor Downs, Texas, the fourth day of July, 1981. He has never been the same since.

GARY CIOCCO teaches Philosophy as a Roman adjunct at Gettysburg College, York College of Pennsylvania, and Mount St. Mary’s University. He has also taught English and has had poems published in several journals. He used to think of himself as a non-prolific, lessalcoholic Jack Kerouac, but now prefers to think of himself as a nonmusical, unnaturally thin Jerry Garcia. As a result, he is very thankful for philosophy.

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