Engaging Resistance: How Ordinary People Successfully Champion Change

By Aaron D. Anderson | Go to book overview

Appendix B
Portland State University

Portland State University Timeline

Summer 1946: Stephen Epler opens the Vanport Extension Center (VEC) with the mission of serving veterans returning from World War II.

Memorial Day 1948: Floodwaters destroy the VEC campus and community of Vanport, Oregon.

Fall 1948: Vanport moves and welcomes the first student to a converted abandoned shipyard affectionately dubbed Oregon Ship.

April 15, 1949: The governor of Oregon signs House Bill 213 allocating the funds to purchase a building (the old Lincoln High School) for the permanent home of the Vanport Extension Center in downtown Portland.

Winter 1952: Epler successfully works with the faculty to change the name of the institution to Portland State Extension Center and is more commonly referred to as Portland State College.

Fall 1952: Oregon Ship moves into the old Extension offices in downtown Portland.

December 1952: Consultant to the State Board of Higher Education recommends extending four-year degree-granting ability to Portland State.

Fall 1953: A second building—a converted Safeway grocery story—is acquired to house the Engineering Department.

1949–55: The organization fights with the governor’s office, and with opponents from the University of Oregon and Oregon State University, to

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Engaging Resistance: How Ordinary People Successfully Champion Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Exhibits vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Prelude to Resistance 1
  • 2 - The Theoretical Backdrop 19
  • 3 - From Planning to Implementation 34
  • 4 - The Nature of Resistance 53
  • 5 - Six Cases of Resistance 76
  • 6 - Engaging Resistance 119
  • 7 - Lessons from the Field 145
  • Appendix A - Olivet College 165
  • Appendix B - Portland State University 173
  • Appendix C - Engaging Resistance- Interview Protocol 181
  • References 185
  • Index 197
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