Isaac on Jewish and Christian Altars: Polemic and Exegesis in Rashi and the Glossa Ordinaria

By Devorah Schoenfeld | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
RASHI AND HIS SOURCES

Rashi and the Gloss both build on their rabbinic and patristic traditions. This chapter, on Rashi, and the next chapter, on the Gloss, will show that they both draw selectively on a range of different sources and adapt them using a variety of strategies to present their exegesis as arising directly from the biblical text. These strategies of adaptation and change allow them to present themselves as in continuity with their respective exegetical traditions.

At the same time, as these chapters will show, both commentaries represent themselves as reading the Bible as a self-glossing text: Difficult passages in one part of the Bible can be explained by reference to other parts of the Bible, and no sources outside the Bible are necessary to understand it. Paradoxically, the exegeses presented in Rashi and in the Gloss can be read as an original and rational response to the biblical corpus as a whole and also as an authoritative record of rabbinic or patristic opinion.

Rashi and the Gloss both build on their rabbinic and patristic traditions, and these clear continuities have affected how contemporary scholars have interpreted the central themes of these commentaries. Shaye Cohen, in his attempt to prove that there is no anti-Christian polemic in Rashi’s commentary on the Pentateuch, interprets Rashi’s heavy reliance on midrash as evidence that any polemic is that of the midrash, not Rashi.1 Elazar Touitou, who identifies a great deal of anti-Christian polemic in Rashi’s exegesis of the first six chapters of Genesis, describes Rashi as deriving this polemic, as well as many of his other ideas, directly from rabbinic sources.2 Similarly, scholarship on the Gloss by Beryl Smalley,3 Margaret Gibson,4 and Gillian Evans5 has tended to emphasize its continuity with patristic literature rather than its originality. However, the dichotomy between originality and continuity is a false one for both Rashi and for the Gloss in their commentaries on Genesis 22. Both draw on their respective sources, and both arrange and adapt these sources in a way that responds to their twelfth-century context.

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Isaac on Jewish and Christian Altars: Polemic and Exegesis in Rashi and the Glossa Ordinaria
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.