Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York

By Midori Yoshimoto | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book directly derives from my doctoral dissertation submitted to Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, in spring 2002. Since then, I have modified some parts of texts in order to update some information and make corrections. Two years of additional work led me to expand my acknowledgments further, but I can never adequately thank all of the individuals who directly and indirectly encouraged me to publish this book. Yet I would still like to express my gratitude toward those who have made this publication possible.

First, I am obliged to the insightful and sincere guidance that Dr. Joan Marter has provided me during these years. Since the beginning of my studies at Rutgers University in 1994, Dr. Marter has strongly encouraged me to study Japanese and Japanese American artists. Under her supervision, I wrote my master’s thesis on Yasuo Kuniyoshi, one of the first Japanese artists to achieve fame in the United States. For my Ph.D. dissertation I decided to attempt the more contemporary topic of performance art by Japanese women artists and Dr. Marter has stood behind me all the way.

I was honored to have Dr. Kristine Stiles, artist and art history professor at Duke University, as a reviewer of my manuscript after two revisions. Since her numerous writings on performance art were among the inspirations for my undertaking of this project, her thought-provoking comments were invaluable for me in bringing the manuscript to the next stage. Dr. Moira Roth, one of the pioneers of study in women’s performance art, also read my manuscript at an early point and encouraged me to publish it. I am also grateful to Melanie Halkias, editor at Rutgers University Press, who trusted in the value of my project soon after my graduation and has supported its publication all along.

I am deeply grateful to four of the five artists of my dissertation topic for their direct willingness to cooperate; without their participation, this project would not have been possible. First, in the summer of 1998, Mieko Shiomi welcomed my research visit to her home in Minoo, near Osaka. During my two-day interview, she allowed me to photocopy important documents that

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