Charitable Choices: Religion, Race, and Poverty in the Post Welfare Era

By John P. Bartkowski; Helen A. Regis | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The completion of any book is a collaborative endeavor, reflecting the efforts of many more people than those whose names appear on its cover. There are many individuals and organizations that we wish to thank for their contributions to this project, and sincerely hope that we have not overlooked anyone in doing so. Where we extend our gratitude to the multiple persons and organizations listed below, we do so alphabetically because it would be impossible to rank–order the contributions of so many.

We extend a special thanks to the religious leaders and benevolence workers in local congregations who gave generously of their time and insights to make this study possible. We are especially grateful to those who welcomed us into their congregations to observe and participate in their benevolence programs. Members of the religious communities whose stories are told here never failed to engage us on intellectual, material, and spiritual issues—and not necessarily in that order. Although we take full responsibility for the interpretations offered here, we have tried to be respectful in our dialogue with our subjects’ experiences and viewpoints. We pay all these persons of faith the highest compliment in saying that we think about faith–based benevolence work quite differently now than we did going into this study.

Various organizations provided generous funding for the study, including the Joint Center for Poverty Research; the Louisville Institute; the MSU Criss Fund; the PricewaterhouseCooper Endowment; the Religious Research Association; the Rural Health, Safety, and Security Institute; and the Southern Rural Development Center. We also thank the reviewers of our research proposals, reports, and other writings submitted to these organizations. We are especially grateful to Mark Abramson, Paul Lawrence, James Lewis, and Scott Thumma in this capacity. Portions of this book were presented as conference papers at various annual meetings,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charitable Choices: Religion, Race, and Poverty in the Post Welfare Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - The Welfare Revolution and Charitable Choice 1
  • 2 - Social Welfare and Faith–Based Benevolence in Historical Perspective 27
  • 3 - Faith–Based Poverty Relief 60
  • 4 - A Tale of Two Churches 86
  • 5 - Debating Devolution 101
  • 6 - Invisible Minorities 121
  • 7 - Street–Level Benevolence at the March for Jesus 142
  • 8 - Charitable Choice 160
  • Appendix- Milieu and Method 179
  • Notes 188
  • Bibliography 192
  • Index 204
  • About the Authors 214
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.