The Hunt for Rob Roy: The Man and the Myths

By David Stevenson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Rob Roy MacGregor became famous through being hunted, and by his reactions to being hunted. For thirteen years, first as a fugitive debtor and then as a rebel attainted for high treason, his ability to evade all the efforts of dukes, the army and the government to capture him won him fame. Thus The Hunt for Rob Roy is an appropriate title for a biography of the man. But there is also another hunt for Rob Roy that is central to the book, and that is my hunt as a historian to disentangle the man who once actually lived and breathed from the vast haystack of legends and hero-worship that has hidden him for centuries. Rob has been an elusive figure for the historian as much as he was for his enemies.

The Rob Roy of the modern popular image was a man unjustly oppressed and persecuted by corrupt and vicious noblemen. But he fights back. He is the outlaw who defies the great, and in the end gets away with it, humiliating them in the process. A man of valour and set purpose who unswervingly held on to his honour and survived in an epic contest of heroic individual against the powers of darkness. He served his own cause, but was also loyal to a political one, that of the Jacobites.

This image cannot be sustained by the historical evidence. There will be many reluctant to accept the ‘real’ Rob Roy. Some readers may wish to continue to like the traditional stories, and find in them excitement and inspiration. Why shouldn’t they? But they may also be interested in the historical biography of the man who lies behind the legends.

In the past, academic historians have tended to ignore Rob Roy. There is some sense in this. He is, from the standpoint of national events and trends, insignificant. His life touches only occasionally and marginally on matters of public importance. Yet in a wider sense Rob is clearly a figure of great significance. In 1817 Walter Scott

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The Hunt for Rob Roy: The Man and the Myths
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Preface x
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Chronology of - The Life of Rob Roy xiv
  • 1 - The Obscurity of Childhood 1
  • 2 - Cattle Raider, Cattle Trader 16
  • 3 - Downfall 44
  • 4 - Chiefs, Pensions and Politicians 70
  • 5 - Rebel 92
  • 6 - Burning Houses 124
  • 7 - Climax 136
  • 8 - Defiance 161
  • 9 - Highland Rogue 184
  • 10 - Jacobite Rebel to Hanoverian Spy 194
  • 11 - Out of Order 223
  • 12 - Their Father’s Sons 233
  • 13 - Life after Death 268
  • 14 - Man versus Myth 286
  • Abbreviations 297
  • Notes 301
  • Index 329
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