Connecting with Kids through Stories: Using Narratives to Facilitate Attachment in Adopted Children

By Denise B. Lacher; Todd Nichols et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Our colleagues at the Family Attachment and Counseling Center contributed valuable and honest feedback, nurturing, and lots of chocolate. We would like to thank Melissa Nichols, an excellent writer herself, who gave us direction in times when we could not find the words. Jan Norman, Maren Harris, and Heather Cargill contributed their wisdom and frequently reminded us that, yes, we could do this. Our readers also gave us much-needed comments and suggestions: Marti Erickson, Greg Keck, Dan Hughes, Ginny Blade, Marcia Mans, Jack Wallinga, and Connie Dummer.

Most of all we would like to thank the parents and children who have shared their experiences of hurt, pain, and anger as well as success and joy with us. Our lives have been blessed and changed by them. Each and every narrative inspired and challenged the methodology, taking it places we had not yet imagined. We really could not have done this without them.


Denise

Thank you, Scott, for listening, encouraging, and shouldering more than your share when there were not enough hours in the day. Holly and Annie, sharing your journey through life has taught me so much about attachment, child development, and parenting. Thanks for not giving up on this “less than perfect” mom; I’m still learning. Mom and Dad, I’m really glad that I can say, “I’m getting more and more like you the older I get.” And Todd, it’s been a longer road than we thought, but made much easier by your friendship.


Todd

Melissa, Jeremy, Anna, and Grace what a wonderful family with which I’ve been blessed! You continue to add so much to my life. Thank you all for your constant support and teaching. Mom, the older I get, the more I appreciate your wisdom. Thank you, Denise, for your tireless writing and rewriting. You’re a wonderful person to work with.


Joanne

I would like to thank the hundreds of parents who contributed to the development of Family Attachment Narrative Therapy and the writing of this book.

-8-

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