Connecting with Kids through Stories: Using Narratives to Facilitate Attachment in Adopted Children

By Denise B. Lacher; Todd Nichols et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Putting the Pieces
Together
Discovering the Child’s Model

And now you ask me through your tears,
age-old question unanswered through the years.
Heredity or environment, which are you a product of?

Robert’s adoptive parents are at the end of their rope. Bill and
Karen are committed to being his parents but lately feel like they
should be committed. After successfully raising biological, foster,
and adoptive children, they believed that they could help Robert,
now four years old. They have parented many challenging
children, but he seems to thwart every effort. The screaming,
hitting, kicking, and spitting don’t faze these parents. Their primary
concern is his almost obsessive focus on getting what he wants,
when he wants it. Bill and Karen describe how Robert sneaks out of
his room at night to play and to get food. When confronted he
denies it. When put back in his room he begins screaming and
chanting to get what he wants, keeping the whole house awake.
They give in to restore peace but feel angry and resentful. Their
home is being run by a four-year-old. He behaves like the perfect
child when anyone else is around but as soon as they leave, he
starts manipulating to get what he wants. “How can he be so good
at it? He’s just four! What’s he going to be like when he’s 13?”
Karen who works at home is the most discouraged. Despite her
best efforts to love and nurture him, nothing has changed in the 14
months he has been with them. No consequence or punishment
seems to matter and they have tried them all. Bill and Karen end
the story by asking: “Why does he do this? How can we help him?”

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Connecting with Kids through Stories: Using Narratives to Facilitate Attachment in Adopted Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgments 8
  • Legacy of an Adopted Child 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter 1 - The Inner Working Model 15
  • Chapter 2 - Putting the Pieces Together Discovering the Child’s Model 33
  • Chapter 3 - Narratives That Bond, Heal, and Teach 48
  • Chapter 4 - Claiming Narratives 65
  • Chapter 5 - Trauma Narratives 80
  • Chapter 6 - Developmental Narratives 96
  • Chapter 7 - Successful Child Narratives 112
  • Conclusion 129
  • Appendix A - Emdr 132
  • Appendix B - Story Construction Guide 133
  • References 135
  • Subject Index 139
  • Author Index 143
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 143

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.